An auto accident can lead to internal bleeding, where you bleed but the blood stays within your body. Internal bleeding is dangerous on multiple levels. The injury is not easy to notice and can lead to further health problems. Below are some auto accident injuries that can lead to internal bleeding plus related complications.

Accidental Injuries That Cause Internal Bleeding

Multiple car accident injuries can lead to internal bleeding. Below are some of them.

Orthopedic Injuries

Bone marrow, which sits deep inside the bone, produces blood cells. The bone marrow has a generous supply of blood to aid it in this function. Thus, some of the blood might flow out if the bone breaks and exposes the marrow. Internal bleeding occurs if the broken bone sits deep inside the body or the fracture doesn’t penetrate the skin.

Consider an example of an auto accident that leads to a spinal fracture. Blood from the bone marrow might bleed into your back without necessarily reaching outside your body.

Blunt Force Trauma

Blunt force trauma occurs from a physical force that doesn’t penetrate the skin. Blunt force trauma typically occurs if a blunt or firm object hits you. Consider a car crash where a blunt object inside the car hits your abdomen, but your skin doesn’t break. The force can damage your internal organs, such as the pancreas or stomach, and trigger internal bleeding.

Penetrating Trauma

Apart from blunt force trauma, penetrating trauma is also a major cause of internal bleeding. Penetrating trauma occurs when an object pierces and enters your body. An example is if a sharp object, such as a broken piece of metal, pierces your abdomen during an accident. The metal might bruise your internal organs, such as the spleen, and cause internal bleeding.

Deceleration Injuries

Deceleration injuries occur if something quickly brings your body to a stop. Auto accidents that occur at high speed are likely to cause deceleration injuries. The injuries occur because different body parts will stop at different times, so the internal organs might hit the body cavity or other organs.

Consider an example of a head-on collision that stops your car within a short time. Such rapid deceleration might cause your internal organs, such as your lungs, to hit the chest cavity at high speed. The impact might bruise your lungs and cause them to bleed.

Compression Injuries

Compression injuries occur if something presses upon your body with enough force to injure your blood vessels or internal organs. Take a case where a car accident impact throws you out of the car, but the car ends up resting on a part of your body. The weight of the car might compress your internal organs or vessels and cause them to bleed.

The Complications

Internal bleeding can lead to several complications that can affect your life in multiple ways. Below are some of the complications.

Organ Failure

Organ failure can occur if internal bleeding restricts blood flow to an organ. Restricted blood flow is dangerous because the organs need blood to nourish them with oxygen and drain toxins.

Brain Damage

The brain needs oxygen to survive and execute its functions. Bleeding inside the brain might deny it of the much-needed oxygen. The accumulated blood can also exert unusual pressure on the brain. Both things can lead to brain damage.

Anemia

Your body relies on red blood cells to transport oxygen. Anemia arises when your body doesn’t have enough cells to transport oxygen to different parts of the body. Anemia typically occurs due to prolonged internal bleeding.

Auto accident injuries can complicate your life. You deserve compensation from the liable party to get your life back on track. Consult The Jaklitsch Law Group to evaluate your case and help you pursue the compensation you deserve.