The term “personal injury” literally means any injury to your “person” (your body). However, in the legal context, it is much broader than that.

A personal injury claim also often involves property damage, emotional damage, lost wages, and more. The claim goes far beyond the medical bills you might need to cover because of a physical injury you experienced.

Personal injury claims often arise out of accidents, whether they are slip and fall incidents or a car crash. They can also be the result of an intentional act, such as intentionally making a dangerous drug or product. You may be surprised to learn just how common personal injury claims actually are.

1. Unintentional Injuries Are the Third-Leading Cause of Death in the United States

There are roughly 175,000 deaths each year because of unintentional injury. Falls and traffic deaths are some of the most common reasons that these accidental deaths occur. Many falls and car accidents lead to personal injury claims.

2. Around two million drivers experience permanent injuries from a car accident every year.

Roughly 31 million people are injured across the country every year because of car accidents, even if those crashes do not cause permeant damage.

Wintery conditions certainly make the likelihood of an accident higher. In fact, more than 116,000 Americans are injured every year because of snowy, slushy, or icy pavement.

Although personal injury claims can arise from virtually any situation, car accidents are the leading cause of these cases. They make up about half of all claims. Many drivers do not realize just how much even a minor car accident can affect them for years to come.

3. Rear-end crashes are the most common type of car accident.

Rear-end crashes account for just under one-third of all types of accidents. In most cases, these crashes are entirely preventable—often by paying more attention, not following so closely, or reducing speed.

4. Construction accidents cause roughly 300,000 injuries per year.

Construction accidents not only affect workers. They also affect anyone near a construction site or visiting a site for any reason. Although workers’ compensation covers construction workers in most cases, there are situations where those laws do not apply, and a personal injury case may arise.

5. Roughly half of the individuals harmed by running a red light are pedestrians or passengers in other vehicles.

Pedestrians are vulnerable targets in a car accident. Even if a pedestrian is hit at just 20 mph, they have a 10% chance of dying. The likelihood rises to 80% when the speed increase to 40 miles per hour.

Personal injuries are much more common than you might think. Get help after your injury situation by calling the team at The Jaklitsch Law Group: 855-BigDog1.